Tag Archives: Fiction

Revision: How to get started?

After the wonderful news earlier this week that Perceval’s Secret had won the Silver Medal in the “Thriller/Mystery/Horror” category in Connections eMagazine’s Readers Choice Awards 2018 (thank you, Melanie Smith!), I spent some time publicizing the news, and I continue to tell the world (of course!). It’s the first time Perceval’s Secret has won anything — indeed, the first time I’ve won anything! Another effect of this award: my work on the first revision of the Perceval Shadow first draft has become urgent. I’ve been thinking about it for a long time, actually, and working through various issues and scenes in my head. But now it’s time to pull out the manuscript and get cracking.

How do I start the first revision?

First of all, as daunting as it might be, it’s not nearly as scary as the blank page all writers encounter when starting a first draft. When the first draft is done, there’s material to work with, to sculpt, to massage, to add to, and to smooth. I have pulled out the manuscript and my working file, what are the next steps?

Steps for First Revision Work  

Read through: It’s been a while since I’ve lived inside this novel, so my first step is to read through the draft. I had printed out a hard copy before. Now, I’ll curl up with it and my purple pen to read it, write notes on the page or on my handy legal pad, and dream about the scenes and characters.

First Chapter: This chapter will almost always need a lot of work (along with the last two chapters of the book). Writing the first chapter can be a nightmare, challenge, or pure joy, depending upon how it goes. What I’ve learned about my own writing is that the first chapter is the most problematic and scares me even more than the ending. I’ve learned that it’s best to pay close attention to what I’ve written, but to not do too much work with revision until after I’ve been through the rest of the book. There will be threads in later chapters that need or have some connection to the first chapter, and I need to know what they are.

What is the purpose of the first revision? Good question. I approach the revision work as steps toward the summit of completion. Each step has a purpose. What each step’s purpose is can be completely up to the writer. For example, one step could be for scene work. Another step could be for narrative structure and character development. Another step could be for line editing. Another step could be for checking for inconsistencies, e.g. a character’s eyes are blue at the beginning and inexplicably brown in the middle of the story. It is helpful to decide at the beginning of revision work what the purpose of each revision will be, and then focus only on that revision’s specified purpose as the work progresses.

The purpose of the first revision of Perceval’s Shadow is scene work. I need to take care of fleshing out scenes including crucial details, looking at character motivation in each scene, and resolving problems within scenes. I expect this will be slow work, and anyway, it shouldn’t be rushed. Because this novel is part of a series, I also need to make notes about what happens in each chapter and how it might relate to action in subsequent books in the series.

How long does a revision take? Forgive me while I have a good laugh at my own question. I’m not a very patient person, and of course, I want the revision to go really fast so I can get on with the next revision. But then I look up at the neon pink sticky note above my desk on which I’ve written “Pay attention.” This is from Zen Buddhism — the goal of staying in the present moment and paying attention in that moment. It’s amazing what can be observed by being still and paying attention. The same holds true for revision work. In order to pay attention to the words, how they build into the structure of your story and the development of your characters, it’s necessary to go slow and proceed with care.

And now, chapter one, page 1….

Who among my readers here are doing revision work right now on a large piece of writing? Do you have your own steps? What is the most frustrating thing about revision work?

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Silver Medal for PERCEVAL’S SECRET!

Artwork from the Connections eMagazine website (thank you!)

Great news today when I checked my email after several days away. Perceval’s Secret won the Silver Medal in the Thriller/Mystery/Horror category of the Connections eMagazine Readers Choice Awards!  This is wonderful news!

Check out the other winners too as well as the magazine! It’s interesting reading, and the award-winning books look quite tempting…..

Mid-Year Writing Update

Last week I was working hard on revisions and used all my weekend time for that kind of writing rather than writing blog posts. This week it’s time to take stock. How’s the writing going this year? Any significant accomplishments?

Non-writing Employment: The first three months of this year, I was working hard on the search for a fulltime job after losing the job in December that I’d landed in April 2017. In March, I accepted a fulltime position with a state health licensing board as their office administrative support. It’s a small office (only three of us) and the work doesn’t follow me home which is wonderful. It’s also far less stressful than the previous job had been. The schedule is not very conducive to writing at the computer during the week but I do an awful lot of writing in my head. Being happier and more relaxed at this job has given me more energy to pour into my writing on the weekends. I may still need to sell some possessions for my financial health which is fine — cleaning out the clutter is always good!

Perceval Novels:
Perceval’s Secret remains on sale (only $2.99!) at Amazon and B&N.com. After running a “Free” promotion last spring and seeing where people went to get their copy of the novel, I removed it from Kobo International. The reviews continue to be good to excellent!  I’d love to hear from readers through reviews at Amazon and B&N, or at Goodreads.

I continue to research and plan promotions for 2018.  I participated in a BookBub promotion also last spring that increased my number of followers there. BookBub also provided a list of those followers from that promotion who are particularly interested in thriller fiction.

As for the other novels in the series, I’m now starting to work on the revision of the first draft of Perceval’s Shadow, the second novel in the series. This is the year of revision work!  I’m sure that as I work on the revision, I’ll also be writing notes for the other three novels in the series. It always amazes me how my opening one door in my imagination can also open other doors to other projects.

Marketing: As I mentioned above, I ran a “Free” promotion for Perceval’s Secret this past spring.  I learned that most people gravitate to Amazon despite the book also being free at B&N and Kobo. I wrote about the results of this promotion and my response to it here.

I’ve been happy that people at my new job have been interested in my writing. I know of one person who bought Perceval’s Secret and read it. She talked with me about her response to it and I loved hearing from her! I still need to utilize the marketing tools at GoodReads, LinkedIn and Publishers Marketplace.  I continue to promote the novel on Twitter and Facebook.  I’ve been writing more posts at the Perceval Novels Facebook page, too.  Please go and like it, and visit often for updates on the novels.

New Novel Project: This project remains on the back burner this year. I still plan to transform my original screenplay, Over the Rainbow, into a novel. I love the story, the main character, and the potential of it, so I hope to be able to work on it soon.

Debt from Publishing Perceval’s Secret as an e-book: I finally finished paying off the credit card debt that I incurred when I published Perceval’s Secret. I still have substantial debt, but it’s not from publishing. I don’t know when I’ll publish the novel as a paperback. It’s still one of those things that I want to do but don’t have yet the money to do.

Short Stories: Lots of success to report here! I finished the revisions of Light the Way.  It is now ready to submit. I spent some time researching possible markets for it, and now I just need to pick one and start the submission process. I also finished the revisions of The Negligee. I’ve decided that this short story falls within the horror genre and I need to research markets for it. I finished the first draft of Aanora and two revisions. Right now, it’s in the hands of a beta reader. I expect that I’ll be doing at least two more revisions before it will be ready for publication.  I’ll be very happy to start getting more of my fiction out in the world.

Blogs: I’ve been participating in a blogfest called #We are the World Blogfest at the Eyes on Life blog (as Gina Hunter) for the past year or so, finding positive stories about humanity and sharing them on the blog. That’s all I’ve been writing at that blog and I’ve lost readership there. So, I will probably end my participation and return to my former commentary format with “The Successful Patient” posts as well as the current events and society commentary. I’ve been struggling with time — having the time to work on my fiction — and blog writing has taken more of a back seat to the fiction writing this year. I still continue to write posts here at Anatomy of Perceval on Saturdays.

Essays/Paid Gigs: I’m only now beginning to figure out if I have the time to do some of these personal essays for ClassicalMPR or other online sites. So far this year, I haven’t had the time.

Journal Writing: I’d hoped to establish a regular habit of journal writing every Sunday, but have failed miserably at this.

The Successful Patient Memoir:
Nothing has changed on this project — still on the back burner.

Reading: My daily conmute during the work week gives me lots of time for reading and I’ve been enjoying that aspect of being back to fulltime employment. I shall exceed my 2018 Reading Challenge at GoodReads. Reading is such an essential part of being a writer, and I’ve enjoyed some wonderful and provocative books so far this year. You can check out my reviews of them on GoodReads, and give me a holler while you’re there!

I’m really looking forward to submitting the two short stories and the Aanora novella, and spending the rest of the year on Perceval’s Shadow!

In Celebration of Summer Reading (as a Writer)

Canada has turned its northwest wind toward Minnesota and we are finally enjoying real Minnesota summer days with dewpoints in the 50’s, temperatures in the upper 70’s and low 80’s, and that wonderful cool Northwest breeze. This weather brings a flood of memories — not of baseball in the sun, swimming, playing tennis or boating. No. It brings a flood of memories of reading, usually outdoors in the shade either on a porch or under a tree, the sounds of swimming, water-skiing and boating on the lake in the background, a lawn mower grazing with a buzz nearby, and the smell of suntan lotion laced with coconut oil. Urban noise pollution wasn’t a part of my childhood, but a lake house, a library card, and lots of free time were.

Today, I’m reading a classic science fiction novel published in 1977 that reminds me of the mid-1970’s rage for disaster movies — Lucifer’s Hammer by Larry Niven and Jerry Pournelle. It’s a fat paperback — my favorite kind — full of characters I can relate to in some way, caught on a planet in the path of an ancient comet.  Will they all survive a direct hit? What will that hit be like? And who cares just how plausible the premise is, right?

Summer reading. Book marketers go immediately to the stereotypical beach reads: thrillers, mysteries, more thrillers, and action adventure stories set in lost worlds of the past or far future. What are your favorite summer reads? Is there really such a thing?

I have a particularly potent memory of one week in August when I was in junior high school. My family was at our lake house. I had been to the library and checked out a pile of books, among them, Sir Arthur Conan Doyle in a collected works omnibus of Sherlock Holmes stories. That August week was unusual for its weather: cool, overcast, often foggy from the humidity, with especially damp chilly nights. We had built a fire in the fireplace and hunkered down inside. I read on the squishy soft sofa upholstered with pink flowers on a dark green background about 6 feet in front of the fire, engrossed in The Hound of Baskervilles. The weather outdoors with its cool enveloping mist created the perfect environment in which to read this scary story. And wild hounds could not have roused me from that sofa.

When I was ten, I discovered the romantic suspense of Mary Stewart in her novel The Moon-Spinners. It was blistering hot outdoors, too hot to sit in the sun or go boating, and after a swim, I would curl up on the rocking lounger (upholstered in dark green vinyl) on the front porch and read about the rugged landscape of Crete, the heat of the Mediterranean sun, the beautiful beach, a small inn run by a Greek family and the mystery surrounding a young Englishman named Mark. From that summer on, I was convinced that the British were the masters of mystery stories.

The year after I graduated college, my first year living in Minnesota, I picked up a book with a strange title: Watership Down by Richard Adams. It was the title that caught my eye. Once I began reading, I couldn’t put that book down, and to this day I’m still amazed that a novel about rabbits could have so powerfully held me in its grasp. A friend had invited me to spend a week with her and her family at their lake cabin in the north woods and I took the book along with me. Now I associate that specific location in northern Wisconsin with reading Adams’ novel.

When summer rolls around, I feel my attention as a writer and a reader circle away from anything heavy or philosophical and toward fun. And fun means mysteries primarily, although this summer I’ve added a science fiction disaster thriller to the mix. In addition to the Niven/Pournelle novel, so far this summer I’ve read The Private Patient by P. D. James, Death and the Maiden by Gerald Elias, Finding Moon by Tony Hillerman, and Airs Above the Ground by Mary Stewart.

What have you been reading this summer?  Any recommendations?

Have You Ever Made Yourself Cry?

After spending all of July 4th working on the first revision of the Aanora story, I wasn’t certain when I’d get that much time again to work on it. I completed over half, exceeding my goal by 18 pages. So it was a good day’s work. Then, as it worked out last weekend, I ended up having all of Sunday afternoon to devote to writing instead of the piecemeal work I usually do on weekends. So I decided to finish the first revision of the Aanora story. And I did.

And I made myself cry.

A complete surprise! As I came to the end of the novella, immersed in that world and the characters, what I’d written made me incredibly sad. I hadn’t thought of it as a sad ending, actually, which is the reason for my surprise. I didn’t think the ending had any kind of emotional punch. It was the ending of that story. Period. But as I was reading that last scene, I started crying, sad for the characters who were saying good-bye. I wasn’t sad that I’d finished the story because I still have work to do on it. I wasn’t sad that I’d never see the characters again because I will.

Now I’m really interested to know how other people will react to the ending, and it will be something I will ask my beta readers. Is it a sad ending?

I’ve wondered also if it’s truly a good thing when something I’ve written affects me emotionally. Is it a good thing when the writing makes the writer laugh? Or cry? Or angry? If it’s someone else’s writing, that’s different. But what about my own writing? If my writing triggers an emotional response in me, does that mean it will trigger an emotional response in readers?

Some time ago, I remember vaguely reading something on the internet somewhere, perhaps a blog post or maybe it was a craft article in a writing magazine, that if a writer’s own words can make herself respond emotionally, especially when the writer knows the characters and story inside and out, it’s a particularly good sign that it will emotionally move readers. What immediately pops into my mind is the opening of the movie Romancing the Stone when Kathleen Turner’s romance novelist character finishes writing a novel in tears. (As a writer, I always wondered which draft she was finishing.) Will it really?

When I finished the first draft, I didn’t cry. I was kind of relieved. I’d finished it. I had already begun to think of the stories that the novella had suggested to me, mulling over when to write them or not, and which one to write first. Then I turned to the two short stories I was also working on. Then I also had a brief period of frustration about working on everything else but not Perceval’s Shadow. It was imperative to leave the Aanora story for a while to ferment. It fermented for 6 weeks during which I rarely gave it a thought. Coming back to it for the first revision felt extremely good, and I was excited to have a whole day to start the work. So my emotional state was not anywhere near where I ended up when I finished the first revision.

Where is Aanora now? I’ve put it away again to ferment some more. I wonder if the ending will make me cry again when I do the second revision?