Tag Archives: “Perceval’s Secret”

PERCEVAL’S SECRET Has Been Nominated! Woo-Hoo!

I found out this afternoon that Perceval’s Secret is a finalist for the Readers Choice Award presented by Connections E-Magazine!  This is wonderful news and came as a huge surprise.

Please check out the entire list of nominees in all categories here. Vote tor your favorites! Voting closes August 1 so you have plenty of time to give Perceval’s Secret or any of the other nominees a read and then return and vote!

Artwork from the Connections eMagazine website (thank you!)

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A Week Later — Was the Free Promotion a Success?

It’s April 14 and outside my windows heavy snow falls at a brisk pace. As the snow accumulates, whitening the world, I am trying to make sense of the results of the free promotion I ran for Perceval’s Secret, March 23 through April 7 (and actually into April 8 for a while). I had not set any specific goals for this promotion because it was an experiment. I did have some questions I wanted to answer:

Is it worth it to have Perceval’s Secret on sale at Kobo International (Kobo.com)?

Kobo continued to perform as it has from the first day in March 2014 that I put Perceval’s Secret on sale. That is, a big fat zero. To my knowledge, Kobo has not provided any kind of supportive promotion, i.e. included the book with other similar books in emailings to potential customers. I do know that Kobo has set up an arrangement with another online store to sell my novel also. To my knowledge, sales at that other online store have been zero. As a result of this continued poor showing, I took my novel off sale at Kobo last Sunday.

Why did I choose to use Kobo initially?  I wanted an online bookstore that would cover foreign markets for the ePub format (the same as Nook). That was Kobo International.

How does B&N.com stand against Amazon?

It surprised me that the free sales at B&N were also zero during the promotion. When I first launched the novel, I did have some sales at B&N; and with a promotion I did for book clubs, people who owned Nooks almost equaled those who owned Kindles. So I’m mystified by this result to the promotion. I’d hoped to move more at B&N and possibly garner some reviews at B&N as a result. I’ll leave the book on sale there because now it’s the only place anyone can purchase the ePub format of the book.

Does Amazon really dominate the online book market as much as I’d heard it did?

According to the results of my free promotion, the answer is yes. KDP Support was not very easy to work with, since they would not allow me to change the price to $0 myself (as the other two online stores did), and they kept claiming that the links I provided showing the book at $0 on sale at B&N and Kobo actually showed it as not being free. It left me thinking that KDP Support (which I’m convinced is based in India since all the names were Indian) had a real passive-aggressive way of dealing with people.

I did not sign up for KDP Select because I chose to sell an ePub edition as well, so Amazon was not the only online store that was selling the book, and in order to be in KDP Select, Amazon needs to be the sole seller. If I’d chosen Amazon as my only online seller and I’d joined KDP Select, there would be more promotional opportunities through Amazon for me. As it is, to my surprise, Amazon has begun sending out promotional emails that include Perceval’s Secret at the top of a long list of books. Thank you for that, Amazon.

The really good news is that over the 2-week period of the promotion, Amazon sold 245 free copies of Perceval’s Secret. That’s 245 more people (I hope) that now own the book and will read it (I hope). I also hope that out of those 245 people, some of them will be moved to write reviews of it for Amazon, or maybe even GoodReads, too. Or maybe even send me a note, either via this blog or via the Perceval Books Facebook page. 

What’s Next?

As a result of the BookBub Follower promotion run by LitRing that I participated in during the first week of my free promotion, I now have an email mailing list of BookBub people who read thrillers. I plan to use this list in some way, perhaps sending out emails to this list for future promotions. Also as a result of the BookBub Follower promotion, I increased the number of my followers at that site by 156. My expectations for that promotion had been very low, so that number was a nice surprise. I also followed back everyone who followed me and had a public profile.

So, I consider this a good beginning to a year of promoting Perceval’s Secret.

Last Day! PERCEVAL’S SECRET is Free!

Today is the final day you will be able to get Perceval’s Secret for FREE!

At Amazon here.

At B&N.com here.

At Kobo.com here.

Despite working with Amazon KDP Support, I was unable to convince them to match the free price at other Amazon sites in Europe, India, Australia, Canada, and Mexico. As I’ve offered earlier, if anyone in these countries would like a free copy for their Kindle, please contact me at percevalbooks dot com and include your country of residence in your request. Anyone who can, please purchase your free copy for Kindle from Amazon US. Copies of Perceval’s Secret are available for other e-readers from either B&N.com or Kobo.com.

Once this promotion is over and I’ve had a chance to take stock, I’ll report on whether or not it was a success.

Thank you to everyone who has already gotten their free copy! I hope you enjoy reading it!

“Perceval’s Secret” FREE through April 7!

Perceval’s Secret is FREE through April 7 at B&N.com, Kobo.com and Amazon.com

Synopsis: In June 2048, American Evan Quinn conducts the Vienna Philharmonic Orchestra in Vienna, Austria as Americans and Chinese conduct talks in that city about their economic relationship to prevent a global economic meltdown. Evan defects to be free of American oppression and brings a “Day of the Jackal” secret with him that could demolish the talks and ignite a global war. Viennese Police Inspector Klaus Leiner, convinced Evan is an American spy, especially after CIA operative Bernie Brown takes an interest in him, organizes a surveillance operation to collect evidence for his arrest. Evan must stay ahead of the police and CIA while establishing his new life and music career. He believes he’s left America behind but has he? Whom can he trust? Finally, he realizes that his secrets could make him his own worst enemy or provide his best chance for survival.

Pricing update: As of March 25, the only Amazon site offering Perceval’s Secret for free is Amazon US. 

Sampling of Reviews at Amazon:

“A dense psychological suspense thriller full of surprises.”

 A chilling story of the world’s near future, with an emphasis not on the amazing technology, but on the personal relationships people have with technology, politics, and each other.”

This book is a well-crafted spy mystery/cold war drama with interesting details about classical music, conducting, and levels within people. It also works in post traumatic stress from a non-military vantage point. The ending leaves this open for additional books and I hope to see a new one.”

Do you like to read suspenseful novels that take you into a different world of experience as well as a different country? If so, check out my thriller novel Perceval’s Secret. It’s available at Amazon, B&N.com and Kobo.com for FREE through April 7, 2018.

 

Nothing Stops the Books Giveaway: Want to win a Kindle Oasis?

In addition, if you’re a member of BookBub.com (or want to become a member), there’s a big promotion going on from March 23-29 sponsored by LitRing. You can enter a drawing to win one of two Kindles Oasis by clicking on C. C. Yager’s name on the giveaway page here. Her BookBub author page will come up and just click to follow her there. Voila! You are now entered to win a Kindle Oasis!

 

After entering the drawing, hop over to Amazon or B&N.com  or Kobo.com and get your FREE copy of Perceval’s Secret to read!

Truth in Fiction

Photo: Marina Shemesh

This morning, I read a really interesting article in the Minneapolis Star Tribune about how demagogues use lying as propaganda (“Trump may not be Hitler, but he has the techniques”). It’s difficult especially when a large portion of an electorate believes lies as truths and believes that anyone else is lying. Demagogues are good at creating that Big Lie, too. Reading this commentary, however, also got me thinking about truth in fiction, and how writing fiction, by definition, is actually making stuff up which could be called lying.

In Perceval’s Secret, indeed, in the entire Perceval series, none of the characters are real people. It’s set in 2048 – how could I possibly know what really happens in that year now? The story is not real either, i.e. nothing that happens in the story actually happens.  How could it?  None of the characters are real. I made it all up.  Why?

At the time I began writing the very first draft (and I thought it was a short story, not a novel), I was interested in the experience of exile, of being forced to leave a home country in order to have a better life, or pursue an occupation, or be free. I didn’t think that the average American really had any conception or comprehension of what that experience is like for their fellow humans on this planet (I still don’t think they do). Then Evan Quinn appeared in my mind while I was listening to a live orchestra concert at Orchestra Hall in Minneapolis and I had my main character. As I began writing and the story developed under my fingertips, it changed a bit from a straight story of exile to one of voluntary exile and what Evan Quinn would do in order to be able to leave an America that in my mind resembled the USSR of the 1970’s and 1980’s.

I found with each revision that Evan and his story was revealing things about how Americans think about their country and the world, how they perceive people in other countries vs. how they perceive themselves, and that American Exceptionalism would eventually damage if not destroy American democracy. Nothing destroys exceptionalism faster than oppressing the population of a country the way the government in the Perceval series oppresses America. At the same time, the government must wage a relentless propaganda campaign assuring the population that what they have now is better than what they had before and they are stronger and more powerful in the world as a result. The propaganda campaign is all lies. This is something Evan discovers when he arrives in Europe on his tour. Demagogues and fascist governments usually cannot risk their citizens having a lot of outside contact because then their citizens will have access to the reality and see the lies.  Unless, of course, the citizens are so indoctrinated that they don’t believe what they see outside their own country.

So all my made up stuff in writing the novel, this fictional story, was revealing things that struck me as being true about humans, true about Americans in particular, and true about oppression. It is in agreement with what another writer once said (I don’t recall who now) that writers lie to tell the truth. I think it’s also the reason why humans need stories in their lives.